‘In Schools With Gardens, the Students Do Better…’

The Washington Post recently did an interesting story on schools in DC with outdoor gardens. The article describes that more than half of public schools there now have gardens after a 2010 law established a school gardening program. Some interesting excerpts:

“The gardens are neither luxuries nor insignificant. To young, formative minds, these green spaces represent an introduction to the delicate and vital dance between nature and the city in a century when the two must come together in harmony as never before.”

“Some lessons are obvious, such as the biology of growing a radish from seed. But the garden offers insights that go far beyond the brass tacks of cultivation. Geology, hydrology, poetry, music, ecology, cooking and microbiology all find a home in this arena we call a garden, as well as dozens of other subjects beyond most people’s imagination.”

“Sometimes the garden coordinators have to focus not on the students but on the teachers. “If they’re having trouble engaging the staff, we tell them, ‘Forget about the kids and start focusing on the staff, and get them to feel the magic of the garden,’ ” Holway said.”

And, perhaps most compelling of all:

“What is becoming clear is that in schools with gardens, the students do better. Many studies are bearing this out. In a newly published University of Maryland study of D.C. school gardens, researchers tracked significant differences in fifth-grade test results between students with gardens and those without. In reading, for example, 61 percent of students in garden schools tested as proficient or advanced, compared with 38 percent in schools without gardens. For math, the difference was 56 percent compared with 36 percent, and for science, 47 percent against 21 percent.”

NKE Progressing to Be ‘Green & Healthy’

For years now, staff and parents at different Oregon School District schools have pursued sustainability and outdoor education initiatives independently of each other. Although much exciting progress was being made, oftentimes people outside that school had no idea it was happening. Starting with this school year, the entire OSD is making a coordinated effort to be more sustainable, all under the umbrella of Wisconsin’s Green & Healthy Schools program.

As explained on the G&HS website, the program:

… supports and encourages schools to create safe learning environments and prepare students to understand, analyze and address the major environmental and sustainability challenges now and in the future through providing resources, recognition and certification. Administered through a partnership between the Department of Natural Resources, the Department of Public Instruction and the Wisconsin Center for Environmental Education, this program provides information, resources and announcements for all school staff, community members and others interested in green and healthy initiatives and activities for Wisconsin schools.

The program recognizes achievement in nine focus areas:

  • community involvement
  • energy
  • environmental and sustainability education
  • environmental health (indoor air quality, chemical management, integrated pest management)
  • health and wellness
  • recycling and waste management
  • school site
  • transportation
  • water

Through achievement in these areas, schools make progress toward three main goals:

1. Reduce environmental impact and costs
2. Improve the health and wellness of schools, students, and staff
3. Provide environmental education, which teaches many disciplines, and is especially good at effectively incorporating STEM, civic skills, and green career pathways.

ghslogoThere are four certification levels: Sprout, Seedling, Sapling and Sugar Maple. Currently NKE is a Sprout—just beginning the process. Fourth-grade teacher Emily Anderson will be leading NKE’s efforts on the G&HS program, including the formation of a student group who will be integral in NKE’s progress.

If you’d like to be involved in this or our other outdoor education initiatives at NKE, please let Mr. Kluck know!

And, just a continual reminder: Please save your Bill’s Food Center receipts and turn them in at NKE. Bill’s support (donating 1% of all receipts we turn in) is integral to our success with the NKE Arboretum and other outdoor education projects at our school.

Outdoor Education Efforts in Full Swing All Summer

As I write this, school has been underway for only a few weeks, but our outdoor education efforts were in full swing throughout the summer. Some exciting updates include:

harvestevening• We held three “Harvest Evenings” throughout the summer. We harvested food from the raised beds in the Arboretum and the outdoor classroom between NKE and PVE and donated the fresh produce to the Oregon Area Food Pantry. We also pulled weeds (so many weeds!) and much more.

• The committee dedicated to enhancing our new outdoor classroom met several times and consulted with experts from Community GroundWorks/Sustain Dane to create a master plan for the entire space from PVE to NKE. You might notice the first new project underway—renovation of the area outside the first/second grade doors surrounding the tree we refer to as “Mother Oak.” This majestic tree will now have a beautiful space surrounding her, including a new butterfly garden certified as a Monarch Waystation, a path and natural seating.

• Plans have begun to be able to serve food raised in our NKE gardens to our students in the cafeteria. We are modeling these efforts after the successful program already in place at the Oregon Middle School, where they use a large hoop house to extend the growing season and serve their homegrown food in the cafeteria’s salad bar. We are actively applying for grants and looking for potential donors for this project. If you are interested in supporting this exciting project, please contact Mr. Kluck or use the donation form on the NKE Arboretum website at www.nkearboretum.org.

• We met with staff from Brooklyn Elementary School to share ideas about our gardening programs. In May 2017 we plan to hold a sort of “garden-palooza” week where all the NKE classes get to participate in planting in our garden beds and celebrate our gardening efforts.

If you are interested in helping with any of these projects—either with your time or with financial support, or if you have new ideas you’d like to discuss, please let Mr. Kluck know. One simple way anyone can help is by saving your receipts from Bill’s Food Center and turning them in at school; Bill’s donates 1% of all receipts we collect back to our Arboretum. That really adds up!

And, finally, you can always follow our progress on our Facebook page.

How Seed Catalogs Turned Into NKE Kids Buying a Farm

Earlier this year, a big pile of old seed catalogs I handed to fourth-grade NKE teacher Emily Anderson during an NKE Arboretum committee meeting took on a life vastly beyond what I had imagined—an opportunity for Project-Based Learning. What is PBL? “Students take charge of their education through hands-on, Project-Based Learning,” explains Ms. Anderson. “PBL  is a dynamic classroom approach in which students boldly explore real-world problems and acquire a deeper knowledge of the content.”

June16Blog-project-based-learning-gardening-LRIdeas for projects may ignite at any time, anywhere, and in this case the old catalogs were perfectly timed for the “Common Core State Standard 4.MS.A.3: Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems.” Traditionally, this standard is met by teaching students how to measure length, width, and the relationship between the two. However, when Ms. Anderson saw those seed catalogs, an idea struck her, she says: What if, instead of using the pre-created curriculum-based SmartBoard lesson to teach area and perimeter, she created her own project using these catalogs?

And so the Buy a Farm Project was born. Each student received $100,000 to buy a farm. “Initially, students thought $100,000 was a lot of money,” Ms. Anderson says. “That is, until they learned that it also needed to cover the cost of buildings/shelters on their farm, seeds for planting, irrigation systems, equipment (tractors, rototillers, etc.), and farm insurance.”

The project began by students individually choosing which crops they’d like to grow. Next, they researched farm animals and decided if they would like to have animals on their farm, too. After that, they used real-life USDA Agriculture Maps online to determine where the best place would be to purchase land, based on the specific fruits, vegetables and animals they were interested in. They learned about Mel Bartholomew’s Square Foot Gardening and used the NKE Arboretum to measure and plan their own garden beds.  

A big step was using LandWatch.com to look at real-life properties that are currently for sale in the United States, Ms. Anderson says. Through weeks of research, students could view what may be available with their $100,000. When confident with their decision, students completed a Land Purchase Request. After they “purchased” their individual property, students had to problem solve for housing options. This led to a conversation about risk management, financial literacy, and insurance.  

Insurance—both dwelling and crop protection—was a key player in the Buy a Farm project. Finally, students rounded out the project by creating a map of their farm based on the specific dimensions of their property and how many acres they’d purchased. This map helped them decide and calculate quantities of seeds to purchase from the many different seed catalogs that were on hand. Eventually, if students realized they needed more money than Ms. Anderson had offered, they learned how to write grants to request additional funding.  

During this project, Ms. Anderson played many different roles, she says: teacher, doctor, insurance agent, farmer, employee of the United States Department of Agriculture, meteorologist and seed catalog owner. Students were assessed and evaluated in real time, with real-life scenarios. “It was more than obvious: They were energized by the role-playing opportunities and captivated with the voice and choice woven within this project,” Ms. Anderson says.

The Buy a Farm project was not a task to be completed at the end of a unit to show mastery of standards or skills. Instead, the learning takes place through participating in the project. “I saw a change in my students that astounded me,” she says. “As time went on, it became more apparent that Buy a Farm resulted in more engaged, self-directed 4th graders who took ownership and responsibility for their learning.”

Not bad for a pile of old seed catalogs! How else can our efforts with the Arboretum and outdoor education inspire more experiential learning at NKE? The possibilities are limited only by imagination. If you’d like to get involved in our efforts, please contact NKE Principal Chris Kluck at cjkluck@oregonsd.net. And you can always follow our efforts on Facebook.

Final Reflections on Kids & Gardening from Sara Lubbers

Sara-Lubbers-salsa-making  Next month, NKE will officially say goodbye to school counselor Sara Lubbers as she retires after 25 years at our school. Ms. Lubbers has been an integral part of the efforts at NKE to encourage outdoor/garden education. I sat down with her to get some thoughts on her passion for gardening and how that impacts our students.

How did you develop an interest in gardening?

My dad was raised in a family of eight during the Depression, when this was the way families were fed from June-October in Wisconsin. My grandmother always had a huge garden and that was how they ate—the farm to table movement really isn’t a new concept! I have a distinct memory of being four with my dad at my grandmother’s garden in Sheboygan. As a little kid I loved flowers and loved to find out about things that were growing. She grew lima beans—what is known as a butter bean—and I would pick and eat them. We always had a large garden growing up, and my dad, along with my grandmother inspired my interest in gardening. Growing up, I enjoyed weeding and harvesting, along with cooking and canning the harvest with my mom. Eating fresh food was a strong value for my family.

Sara-Lubbers-gardeningHow does that translate into your work here with kids?

Ever since I’ve been here, the Arboretum has been an area in transition. Various staff members through the years have taken interest in it and have wanted to develop the space to have native plants, but nothing specific for gardening like it is now really took shape. Depending on who was on staff, we had different revitalizations of the Arboretum, and I’ve always tried to be an active participant. As a school counselor, I think movement is important, being out in nature—kids can deal with stress and personal struggles by being outside. Nothing has pleased me more than the current revitalization of the Arboretum with active parents wanting to make this a priority four years ago. I jumped on the team and played an active role in making sure we could have garden beds. That was my focus, although I think the other areas are important, too. Kids being healthy and knowing where their food comes from is vital for this next generation.

Are there certain memories that have stuck with you?

Some of my great memories are of being involved with the planting of our first raised beds, teaching students about the process of planting and then helping students to make salsa in their classrooms. After our first year of having raised beds, we had an amazing tomato harvest. I just offered to help, and some classrooms took me up on the offer. Staff brought in blenders and food processors, and we made salsa and bruschetta. I will never forget going out in the Arboretum with a group of students from Andrea DeNure’s classroom. I took a group and we took some bowls and we gathered cherry tomatoes and small yellow tomatoes. They were like, “But this is yellow!” I said, “Yes, tomatoes come in many different colors.” Some were on the ground, and they asked if we could eat those, and what the straw was for …  just the learning lessons that come from questions in important with the process of understanding  what it takes to grow healthy food. Children are so earnest in wanting to know. It was so exciting to see how thrilled they were to taste the tomato and make something with it. This is project-based learning, and you want high engagement in whatever you are having kids learn. Participation and motivation is higher and it brings many of their skills together. It’s not just food; it’s about measuring, about math and reading … being able to speak about it and articulate what’s happening through the process.

Kids-seedsWhat impact has your outdoor education training had?

After our first year of moving forward with parent involvement and bigger long-range plans for the Arboretum, I and a couple other staff members took a weeklong summer class class for educators on gardening education with Community Groundworks here in Madison. That was a very important class for me because I was with like-minded people and we were at Troy Gardens, which has a very developed gardening program for children where they live. Kids can come at no cost and make something fresh or do art projects in the garden or just sit and be quiet and read. It is a very well-developed program, and I was able  to see that functioning. We were able to meet other people involved in this whole area of school gardens, and Madison has a very strong program in school gardens. One of the really fun things we did at the end of the week was take tours of these gardens and see not only what they grew but how they were doing it, how it was laid out and accessible for different developmental needs.

How has use of the Arboretum outdoor classroom changed in recent years?

Now staff are not so reluctant to use it, the interest in using the raised beds has increased and staff are using the various spaces for creative writing, breaks and more. The space in recent years has become attractive and a desirable place to be. With the recent spring weather, kids have been out there reading and writing. I really think most classrooms use it at some level. The hope is that it will continue being part of our Netherwood culture. Kids really want to know: How does a tomato grow? How do onions grow? You can pick beans and then eat them? Kids learn that way and get excited and tell their friends. It’s been wonderful—one of those extra perks—that I’ve been able to be in a school and combine my passion for gardening education. As a counselor I advocate for kids to deal with their problems and learn healthy ways to manage their struggles, and the Arboretum goes hand in hand with that.

Fun Theme Gardens to Try with Kids

Kids love digging in the dirt no matter what, but planting a garden can be even more fun and meaningful when you pick a theme and plan the garden together. Here are just a handful of the fun ideas you can try at home (you can find many more by searching online). Some of our classes will be trying these this spring! Remember, you don’t need a huge space to start a garden. Even a few containers on a patio can provide a fun and productive garden for your family.

3SistersGarden

A Three Sisters garden of corn, squash and beans. (Photo credit: https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/hoop-house_gardener/conversations/topics/2350)

ABC Garden: Try to grow one plant for each letter of the alphabet and make your own letter markers to use in the garden.

International Garden: Choose a country or culture and make plant selections based on what is typically grown and eaten there.

Literacy Garden: Choose plants based on a favorite children’s book, such as “Growing Vegetable Soup,” “Peter Rabbit,” “The Ugly Vegetables” or the Winnie the Pooh books.

Pizza Garden: Grow all the ingredients for pizza such as tomatoes, peppers, oregano, basil, onions, garlic, and more.

Rainbow Garden: Try to plant at least one food for each color of the rainbow.

Salsa Garden: Grow all the ingredients to make your own salsa, such as tomatoes, cilantro, onions, peppers, and garlic.

Tea Garden: Grow herbs such as chamomile, mint, lemon verbena, lemon basil, monarda and more that can then be used to have your own tea party!

Three Sisters Garden: Plant corn, beans, and squash together—according to Iroquois legend, those are three inseparable sisters who grow and thrive only when they are together.

Try-It Garden: Choose foods that the kids have never heard of or tried before.

An Early Spring at NKE

As I write this, we’re just getting past two weeks of frigid temps and a fresh snowfall. But behind the scenes at school, our minds are focused on creating an early spring inside the classrooms at NKE. This year, for the first time, we have many classes who will be doing seed-starting projects using grow lights.

SeedlingGrowLightEverything from pumpkins and peppers to kohlrabi and cabbage can be easily started inside, some as early as March. The classes will nurture the seedlings until they are ready to be planted in our raised beds in the Arboretum. We also have new raised beds slated for construction first thing this spring in the outdoor education space between NKE and PVE.

This effort was initially inspired by a grant we received from the Wisconsin Medical Society Foundation supporting gardening at school. Part of that grant went to buying seed-starting kits. As it turns out, we have so much interest we are dedicating money from the NKE Arboretum fund-raising to buying enough kits so all interested classes can participate in this fun, engaging project.

If you would like to support the NKE Arboretum projects, we always welcome help! We meet the first Mondays of the month at 5 p.m. at school, and you can make a monetary (tax-deductible) donation by going to www.nkearboretum.org and clicking on “How to Donate.” Keep an eye out for our first spring volunteer day announcement, too (follow us on Facebook to find out dates as they are planned).

The Amazing Impact of Learning Outside

NKEArb2015-SensoryWritingFor many people, it’s common sense that outdoor education—letting our children learn outside the confines of the classroom—is beneficial for learning. (When you have a wiggly little kindergartner like mine, that’s a no-brainer.) But there is a great body of research supporting this idea, too, and it shows benefits far beyond just science and environmental education. Here are some interesting facts from that research (thanks to the website classroominnature.weebly.com, which has a great compilation of research on this topic).

  • In one study it was found that when the outdoors was used as a learning environment, there was an increase of 73% “… in the understanding of mathematical concepts and content,” along with a 92% increase in mastery of math skills, and an 89% increase in enthusiasm for studying math.
  • A cross-cultural research study found that the single-most important factor in developing personal concern for the environment was positive experiences in the outdoors during childhood.
  • Outdoor education classrooms are important to supporting the multiple intelligences of all children and are exceptionally suited for meeting the needs of children with emotional and behavioral challenges.
    The bond between an adult and child, along with a child and the environment, is strengthened when an outdoor classroom is used. These bonds help support learning problem-solving skills.
  • Outdoor classroom experiences can lead to gains in social development. Children more easily move away from confrontation with peers in an outdoor environment and are less likely to display lack of cooperation, frustration, and annoyance. Even more, it was found that adults may actually relate differently to children when in an outdoor environment. This is because students are allowed to move more freely and make noise while outside, as compared to inside where they are expected to sit still and remain quiet.
  • While outdoors in nature, a child is more likely to encounter opportunities for decision-making that stimulate problem-solving and creative thinking because outdoor spaces are often more varied and less structured than indoor spaces and induce curiosity and the use of imagination.
  • Not only does the outdoor classroom provide children an opportunity to investigate the natural world, it allows for an environment to conduct group activities where the development of knowledge can occur. Specific skills and concepts are developed in this outdoor environment that connect with authentic, purposeful, and real-life objectives.

These are just a small sampling of the benefits that have been demonstrated. At NKE, we are fortunate to have a wonderful Nature Explore-certified Arboretum outdoor classroom, as well as the new outdoor learning area between NKE and PVE. If you would like to help support the development of either area, we welcome your input! To get involved, please contact Principal Chris Kluck. If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation supporting the NKE Arboretum, you can find the donation form on our website here.

Our Big Compost Project

1-16-PullingLeavesWe are extraordinarily proud that in late fall 2015, we were able to restart our cafeteria composting program at NKE. As of mid-December, after only about two months, we had already composted 300 gallons of food scraps from the cafeteria. That is a huge quantity of waste being kept out of the landfill!

Basically at lunch we are collecting fruit, vegetables (the “green” items) and brown napkins. The leaves, pine needles and twigs from the arboretum serve as our “brown” materials and we throw that on top to cover the lunch scraps. The 4th grade service committee members have been taking out the food scraps to the compost bins that were built with NKE Arboretum fund-raising money next to the garage. Some 3rd graders helped rake the Arboretum and haul more leaves to the compost bins to refresh our “brown” supply.

Going forward we are still working to find more adults to take the compost out with the students. (There are many kids who can’t wait to take it out!) We can’t wait to show the kids the gorgeous “dirt” created from their lunchroom scraps.

If you’re interested in learning more about composting, you can check out this useful UW Extension resource.

 

Outdoor Learning Growing at NKE

10-15-KidsVeggiesFoodPantryIt seems at least once a week there is a new study released demonstrating the positive effects of nature on our lives, whether it is more trees in our neighborhoods leading to less depression or children learning better when they are able to be outside. Here is just a sample of interesting stats:

• Simply spending time outside with nature contributes to increased energy, wards off feelings of exhaustion, and results in a heightened sense of well-being.

• Having a school garden changes eating habits, improves test scores and promotes physical activity, among many other benefits.

• Having vegetation around schools cuts down on air pollution and boosts memory and attention.

• Schools with learning gardens have less teacher turnover.

• Outdoor education classrooms are important to supporting the multiple intelligences of all children, and they are exceptionally suited for meeting the needs of children with emotional and behavioral challenges.

• The single most important factor in developing personal concern for the environment is having positive experiences in the outdoors during childhood.

Here at NKE we are extraordinarily fortunate that now we have not one, but two spaces dedicated to outdoor learning. We have a certified outdoor classroom—the NKE Arboretum—literally within the walls of our school. And now, thanks to the recent referendum, we also have a new outdoor classroom where there recently was an expanse of pavement between NKE and PVE. These spaces are both works in progress. If you are interested in getting involved with continuing improvements in any way, whether you have a great idea for a new project, you are an artist who might be interested in helping create an art installation, or you just love to push wheelbarrows of mulch (hey, it’s possible), please get in touch by emailing Principal Chris Kluck. In the meantime, you can keep tabs on what is going on in the NKE Arboretum by following us on Facebook. Hope to see you soon!

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