‘In Schools With Gardens, the Students Do Better…’

The Washington Post recently did an interesting story on schools in DC with outdoor gardens. The article describes that more than half of public schools there now have gardens after a 2010 law established a school gardening program. Some interesting excerpts:

“The gardens are neither luxuries nor insignificant. To young, formative minds, these green spaces represent an introduction to the delicate and vital dance between nature and the city in a century when the two must come together in harmony as never before.”

“Some lessons are obvious, such as the biology of growing a radish from seed. But the garden offers insights that go far beyond the brass tacks of cultivation. Geology, hydrology, poetry, music, ecology, cooking and microbiology all find a home in this arena we call a garden, as well as dozens of other subjects beyond most people’s imagination.”

“Sometimes the garden coordinators have to focus not on the students but on the teachers. “If they’re having trouble engaging the staff, we tell them, ‘Forget about the kids and start focusing on the staff, and get them to feel the magic of the garden,’ ” Holway said.”

And, perhaps most compelling of all:

“What is becoming clear is that in schools with gardens, the students do better. Many studies are bearing this out. In a newly published University of Maryland study of D.C. school gardens, researchers tracked significant differences in fifth-grade test results between students with gardens and those without. In reading, for example, 61 percent of students in garden schools tested as proficient or advanced, compared with 38 percent in schools without gardens. For math, the difference was 56 percent compared with 36 percent, and for science, 47 percent against 21 percent.”

Copyright © Netherwood Knoll Arboretum
Visit Us On Facebook